Creating Systems to Stay Sane in Your Business with Theresa Truong - The Content Experiment
Theresa Truong

Creating Systems to Stay Sane in Your Business with Theresa Truong

You can’t just create content and push it out there when you feel like it. You need a strategy, and you most definitely need to have systems to help you stay in the flow and reduce the amount of time and frustration you’re feeling around content and marketing.

In today’s episode, I’m chatting with Theresa Truong, founder of Loop Link, about what a director of operations can do for your business, the importance of standard operating procedures, how to simplify your content creation–and why you need to create content just for internal use.

And, of course, Theresa is one of the speakers at The Content Experiment Summit. She is talking all about scaling your content with systematization. You can sign up right now at The Content Experiment Summit. If you’re listening in real-time, registration is officially open and we get started on March 15, 2021.

Tune in!

Mentioned in This Episode

About Theresa Truong

Theresa Truong is an Operations Coachsultant™ and Client Experience extraordinaire with a knack for all things “left-brained”, including organizing, strategizing, and systemizing, make her an ideal fit for her “right-brained” creative CEO clients.

Through her 18+ years of experience, Theresa works with creative consultants and strategists to streamline and systemize their online operations to run the right way with or without their direct involvement. Theresa wanted the flexibility to spend time with her family, and the freedom to serve in her passion: creating, designing, and refining systems for other types of businesses.

Learn more about Theresa by visiting her website or follow her on Instagram and YouTube.

Transcription

Abby Herman
Hey there, and welcome to Episode 106 of The Content Experiment Podcast, a podcast that supports the idea that content and marketing are ever-moving targets in any business. And it’s okay if you don’t feel like you’re doing it. All right, all of the time, you have permission to experiment with little tweaks and changes in your content, to find out what works for you, what increases value for your audience, and what grows your business, and most importantly, what feels good for you.

I’m Abby Herman, content strategist and coach for online business owners who are ready to make a bigger impact online. I firmly believe that success isn’t about what big marketing brands and so-called gurus think is the right thing. It’s about you and your business, your lifestyle, and frankly, your values and belief systems. You get to do business in a way that works for you. If you’re new to the podcast, I am so glad you’re here. I work really hard to bring you informative and to-the-point content because let’s face it, no one has time for fluff these days. If you like what you hear, hit the subscribe button so you don’t miss another episode.

Have you left a rating a review yet? Leaving a rating and review helps Apple Spotify, Stitcher, and all the other platforms and me know that you like what you’re hearing. And it helps to get the podcast and more earbuds and who doesn’t want that.

And on today’s episode, I am chatting with Theresa Truong about the operations, the systems behind content marketing because I’ll tell you, you can’t just create content and push it out there. When you feel like it, you need a strategy. And you most definitely need to have systems to help you stay in the flow and reduce the amount of time and frustration you’re feeling around content and marketing. And of course, Theresa is one of the speakers on the content experiment summit in March 2021. talking all about scaling your content with systemization. Because you really can’t grow your visibility if you don’t have a system around doing it. Let me tell you a little bit about the summit.

Before we get into Theresa’s interview. The summit is for coaches and course creators and features 25 speakers who are sharing bite-sized tips and tricks on how to get a better ROI on their time and financial investments in content and marketing. Because maybe what you’re doing isn’t quite working for you. Either you’re confused about what to create, or what you’re creating and publishing isn’t giving you the results that you want. Maybe you want to start using a new platform or tool but you don’t know how to do that. We’ve got you covered in the content experiment summit. The free summit featured speakers on topics like using productivity tools with their content, online events, staying profitable, even during a pivot, selling with affiliates, honing your messaging speaking to scale your pot, your business, using podcast to grow your business, customer journey and so much more. And many of the speakers or people who you may not have heard from over and over and over again, I’m hoping to introduce you to new powerhouses that give you permission to do things just a little bit differently.

If you’ve been following me for a while, you know that that’s really important to me, if you can sign up right now at thecontentexperiment.com/summit. And if you’re listening in real-time, registration is open now and we get started on March 15, 2021. If you’re listening later, still go to the content experiment.com slash summit and join the waiting list. Do you want to know who the speakers will be?

Well, everyone who has been on the podcast since the first of this year is on the speaker lineup, along with today’s guest Theresa Truong. And in our conversation, Theresa and I chat about what a director of operations can do for your business, the importance of standard operating procedures, how to simplify your content creation, and why you need to create content just for internal use. Now, let me tell you a little bit more about Theresa so we can get on to the interview already. Theresa Truong is an operations coach Sultans and client experience extraordinary with a knack for all things left-brained, including organizing, strategizing, and systemizing which makes her an ideal fit for her right-brained crazy creative CEO clients through her 18 plus years experience. Theresa works with creative consultants and strategists to streamline and systemize their online operations to run the right way with or without their direct involvement sounds like a dream. Theresa wanted the flexibility to spend time with her family and the freedom to serve and her passion creating, designing, and refining systems for other types of businesses. Without further ado, let’s hear from Theresa.

Hi, Theresa, thank you so much for joining me today.

Theresa Truong
Oh, hi, Abby. So glad to be here. And thank you so much for having me on your show.

Abby Herman
Yes. Well, I am excited to have you here and to have you as part of the Content Experiment Summit coming up in just a few weeks. And I really happy to connect, because like I was saying before we hit record, you and I have very similar circles, but we’ve just never chatted before.

Theresa Truong
Yes, that’s right. That’s right. All we’re gonna have such a good time.

Abby Herman
Yes. All right. So before we dig in and get started, can you tell listeners what you do and who you do it for?

Theresa Truong
Yes, so my name is Theresa Truong, I am the CEO of loop link, Coachsulteam, I am an operations coachsultent. And my approach is more of a hybrid approach where, you know, I help you in the capacity of a coach and a consultant coaching to help you grow as a business owner and consulting to help you grow your business. And through that format, I’ve been helping small businesses really reform their operations by organizing and optimizing, really leaning out all of the excess waste, I would like to say, that’s really weighing down their business. And, and what we do is we kind of really centralize everything, really consolidate a lot of the processes and the various systems and really power it up so that the, you know, the business can really function together as a team, but also be able to extract the CEO from the day to day so that the CEO can really step into their role to lead the organization to towards their vision.

Abby Herman
So how does the way that you work with your clients help you to live the lifestyle that you want?

Theresa Truong
Oh, that is such a great question. And Abby, I’m going to be honest, is that it depends on the season of growth that I’m in, and you know it all, every single time you level up, you know, you always hit that ceiling, where it requires a lot more of your time. And so as I began to really serve my clients in the capacity of systems, processes, and optimization, you know, at the early stages of the implementation and integration work, you know, it was very rewarding, because I was able to really help them achieve their dreams of stepping out of the day-to-day, and I was able to step out of the day to day because I had an efficient team to be able to really help with the implementation work. But as I began to level up more into a leadership, a strategic leadership role with the businesses I was working with, it required a little bit more of my time. And so you’re constantly just reworking the way how you want to work and show up to serve, but not jeopardizing your boundaries, but also your- the lifestyle that you’re you’re trying to pursue.

Abby Herman
Yes, boundaries are so important. And I often have loose boundaries when it comes to business. And that’s definitely something that I’ve been working on.

Theresa Truong
I would like to say, you know what, it’s passionate boundaries, right? When you’re passionate about the work.

Abby Herman
Mm-hmm. Yeah, when you’re passionate about it, you want to do it and you want to be, you know, Monday mornings are fun, because I get to sit down and do what I love. I’ve had my relaxation time, I’ve had my time outdoors. And now it’s time to do the work. And I do love doing it. So it does make boundaries difficult. So you are a certified director of operations? You worked with one of my very favorite people on that, and how do we get and Greg, can you talk a little bit about what that means and how being a director or director of operations is different from an online business manager or an administrative assistant or virtual assistant? Because Natalie and I talked about that on the podcast, a while back, and I’ll link to her episode in the show notes. But I’d love to hear it from a DOOs perspective as well.

Theresa Truong
Yes, absolutely. And Abby, this is such a great question. Because, you know, as you continue to grow and build your business, building it beyond yourself truly means that like, you know, we’re always looking for a second us, right, someone who’s similar to us, we often say I wish I can clone myself. And so a director of operations is similar in that aspect where you have found your right-hand person and usually they operate in conjunction with the other side of your brain. And they really understand what the vision is and be able to really articulate it into, you know, action plans that will really actualize the goals and the aspirations of the business. So as a director of operations, that’s typically we serve in a different functionality, almost To where it is a little, a lot more strategy and management versus really doing the work and being in the weeds.

But yes, truly It is about just being able to, you know, hear what the CEO is really saying and being able to build up the strategic roadmap. So that that can truly happen and be handed off to the team for execution. A lot of the legwork for that is to be able to really identify the risks, being able to see where any gaps are going to be happening, to be able to prioritize, and really help the CEO, you know, identify what are going to be the low hanging fruits and how we can really, you know, achieve this with velocity C, and get the realized benefits back from it as soon as possible. Now, the DO role is a little bit in my, in my perspective do is a lot is different from an OPM in the way where, you know, DO’s lead a little, a lot more, we guide our teams, we have a pulse on the financial state of the business as well, but also be able to do a lot more of the hiring as well, placements, finding the right talent to continue to grow the team to be able to fill in the gaps, so that the team can fully support the business, and therefore support the vision and the CEO, the OBM, typically, I’ve seen are a lot more in the weeds, so which means that they are doing a lot more of the work, you know, there are different various levels of management that an OPM is responsible for.

But typically, they don’t do a lot of hirings or have visibility into the financials. And then we go to the VA where they are strictly more execution-oriented. So what that means is that typically they work off of a plan, as long as all the information is there, they’ll be able to execute well, but usually, a lot of the VA that I have worked with, are not strategic, they are more of Okay, give me the action plan, I will get it done for you.

Abby Herman
Okay, so we’re talking about content and marketing here today. And I know that one of the things that trips up people so much when it comes to content, in addition to like, not having a clue what to create, not knowing what to do. But next, I feel like it’s actually sitting down and doing the work and getting the work done. Because anytime you’re creating content, doing anything marketing related in the business, there’s multiple touchpoints, multiple steps and processes to actually getting it done. And then you have to put it out there into the world. Right? So it’s not just finishing it, it’s publishing it too. Can you talk a little bit about the benefits of systematizing content planning and creation? And what it looks like?

Theresa Truong
Oh, absolutely. And this is probably one of my favorite topics to, to kind of just engage with. And a huge part of it. When we start thinking about content, we start thinking about like, oh, there is like, you know, like you just painted it out there. So many touchpoints, so many steps to kind of really roll it out. And on top of that, to be able to corroborate the the the ideas and the content and the resources around that. And so sometimes it can feel very heavy. And, you know, oftentimes we wonder well, can that even really be systematized at all? And the answer is yes. Because when you are so close to it, if sometimes the pattern is not as visible, right. But for someone who is not too close to it to be able to see it from a 30,000-foot view, they can see the patterns, they can see the flow of what needs to take place, and therefore would be able to really standardize a lot of those processes. And so the best way to kind of really approach that is to really simplify as well is understanding which bucket which stage that the the the process is in and then being able to say these are the bare minimum requirements that we would need. So for example, if it is in the content strategy section, you know, sometimes you might want to have like a title, for example, what is going to be the objective, what is the outcome of the or the true output of that content going to be? Where is it going to be published to, and so forth. And so by understanding some of those key attributes that you need to have in the processes, you’re going to be able to systematize a lot of those steps. And so I hope I haven’t lost you.

Abby Herman
Well, so you and I were talking before I hit record about me bringing on a new employee recently and she, because, you know, my assistant and I, we absolutely had all of the systems down pat. And we knew exactly what to do you know what happened first and then and next in every project. And then somebody new walks into my business and really opened our eyes to the fact that maybe we don’t have these systems as documented as we should, because she didn’t know where to file, find the files that she needed. And she didn’t know where to check off that something was completed. And what happens when, you know, we don’t hear from a client on this or on something else. And in my head, I’m thinking, Well, of course, you should know that. But of course, she doesn’t, because she doesn’t know anything about the inside of my business. Right? So how do you? Like what, how do you communicate this information? What’s the best way to track this information so that when new people come into the business, when you know, I make the joke, well, if somebody gets hit by a bus, you know that something, it’s still worth is still going to happen, it’s still going to get taken care of, because we have these systems in place, and nobody has to read anyone’s mind. So that’s the goal. So how do you get to that point?

Theresa Truong
Yes, that is such a great realization, for sure. And you know what, when it comes to building out systems, it’s so many multi facets and multi-levels towards that, right. And so, a lot of the time when we think about systematization, we think that it’s only about the SLP. We think that you know, sometimes it’s just about the loom videos. But what is the success path is what I’d like to call it right. And so the best way that I’ve always encouraged organizations to really get, you know, get that kind of communication or fast track, the onboarding of a new team member is actually through an internal training program. So for example, I use member vault as my course delivery platform for some of my programs. And so what I did was, in my early years, when I was starting to bring on new team members, I found that I was repeating myself over and over again, and no matter how good my SOPs were, they didn’t have the right pathway to really go through the SOPs to really be able to connect the dots so to speak. And so what I did was I actually created a training program in member vault and I treated them as if they were like, you know, a client or a new buyer or purchaser and they went through that program, walking step by step, how to onboard a new client, what to do when we needed to have certain communications out, they can find swipe files there. And well, most importantly, they understand what are a lot of the guidelines that we have in order to run our business. So for example, refund policies, what to do with, you know, outstanding tasks that are over five days, how do we approach it, who needs to be informed about it, and how to escalate those types of matters.

Abby Herman
And that’s such a great idea to use MemberVault in that capacity. I never thought of doing that for something like this for something internal. So for those of you who are not familiar with member vault, it’s a learning platform that I use, I have all of my instructional content for clients there, and for members of my membership program and for my students, but I never thought of using it for an internal purpose. So can you explain why that versus putting something like that in a project management system? Something like Trello? Or ClickUp? Why put it someplace else outside of where you’re probably managing all of those client projects?

Theresa Truong
Yes. So there’s two schools of thoughts to this right, is that in the project management tool, it’s great to be able to still reference your recipes, your processes, and usually, a lot of the tasks will be you know, prompts of the actions that are needed to be taken. However, that’s just truly what it is, as well, like, even though you can put a description in place, for someone new coming on board, sometimes what they need is a little bit more than that. They need to be able to hear the thought process behind, you know, why the task is being crafted or managed that way. You know what to do if, you know like, there are some blockages or challenges that they may come up with, and what are some of the boundaries that they kind of need to put in place. Now, I’m not sure about you, but sometimes when I take a look at a task, and if I see a whole description that you know, spans four to five paragraphs long, I’m not quite sure if I would even read through it in order to go. Great.

Abby Herman
I do not read stuff like that. No, to my detriment. I don’t. It’s terrible.

Theresa Truong
Actually, and so like, you know, part of my onboarding process is just to kind of get the team to kind of go through a lot of those videos and through member vault, there are less than questions that I just kind of reiterate through that. So then that way, they can actually pause and go through it themselves. And on top of that, you know, you would just couple it up with your project management tool, where you can prompt them to do some testing around there as well. And so what you have been able to do for your clients or for some of your programs, you can truly do it for your own team to build up the velocity. And, you know, one of the key elements for that is, imagine if you had to onboard three writers at a time, how can you guarantee or improve the rate that they will have the same learning path and be able to really get up to speed at the same time?

Abby Herman
Yes, because, you know, they would all be working on different projects, they’d be working in different silos, I guess, versus all doing the same thing. So that absolutely makes sense. Mm-hmm. Interesting. Okay. So let’s talk about a business owner who has a podcast who has a blog, and is looking to simplify the process between developing the content strategy and the ideas to actually hitting publish on the content because I think I feel like for most of the people I talked to, it’s that in-between period, that they really struggle with actually sitting down and recording the podcast, or writing the blog post, creating the social media for it, loading it into all of the systems that they need to be loaded into, and then actually getting things scheduled and published, what are some specific SOPs or specific systems that we should have in our businesses in order to make sure that we have a good flow? And that we’re not getting hung up by all of those little details that we have to remember?

Theresa Truong
Mm-hmm, absolutely. And Abby is such a critical piece because you know, technologies these days are not the same as it was 10 years ago, right, it allows us to be able to really manage it as a CEO, or as the team grows, right. And I that’s, I think, the best way for me to kind of frame this is going to be in two parts. One part is if you’re still a solopreneur, how do you manage the front-end process all by yourself? And then the second part is, if you have begun to transition towards a team, how can you continue to, you know, trust in the process and make sure that it is still going to have the same output, regardless, even if you are doing it. So, you know, through your front-end process as a solopreneur, the best thing to do is to really, how to simplify it is to really map out and visualize what that process is going to look like. In each of those steps, the key element that you want to kind of pay attention to is which hat you’re wearing, so to speak. So for example, if I was, you know, creating a content plan, then I am going to put on my, you know, strategic hat, right, and my contact manager. And then the other component, as we continue to build out the flowchart is to really recognize when it’s going to really get done.

So I was talking with a client this morning, actually, and we were talking about the YouTube process, for example, you know, and a lot of it is like, Oh, well, I can batch my YouTube videos on day one, which let’s say it’s Sunday or Monday. And then, you know, on Tuesdays, we would have a specific function for it. So whether or not it is creating the assets for it, or creating the meta descriptions for it. And then, you know, day by day three, the videos need to be edited, turned over, and then uploaded, optimized, and so forth. Right. And so sometimes it’s just about knowing what are the key major steps that need to get performed, the hats that are the roles that need to perform them, but also as well, where the handoff points truly need to be? The biggest thing when you are doing it as a solopreneur is staying consistent and getting ahead because sometimes we think, oh, I’ve already gotten out four episodes, I’ve already gotten out four blog posts, I’m ahead but very quickly, we’ll be able to, we’ll be able to see Oh, I’m down to one now I need to scramble to kind of get the next content plan in place and pump up the next batch right. But it’s about getting yourself into that rhythm of okay for this week or next week. Now we can do to on the third week and then continued the trend with two per week for example.

Abby Herman
I love the fact that you’re talking about batching because and you talked about putting on the different hats, I think that that is so important because like you used to your point we get behind, and then we think, Oh crap, I’ve got to get this podcast, it’s going out tomorrow, I better sit down and put together my outline so that I can record it. And I mean, honestly, that’s a really inefficient way to do it batching them doing, you know, recording 2, 3, 4 videos at a time or, you know, outlining several blog posts at a time is much more efficient, because you can put on that planning hat, and then you’ve got the actual the production hat or the recording hat. And then you’ve got the asset hat, where you’re putting together the assets and the social media posts and the graphics for it. And then the next day, you’re maybe scheduling it, I think that gives you such an opportunity to, I feel like, get it created in advance. And you’re saving so much time and your end result, your products that you’re putting out there is much higher quality. Because you have that review process, I feel like you have that review process as you go through because I’ll go through and like reread my email before I put it out there or listen to the podcast again, before I read the social media. So I have a better idea of, you know, what I’m actually putting out there into the world. And it’s much more efficient when you’re doing it on your own.

Theresa Truong
Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. And I think like to one point that you mentioned there. So what happens once you start hitting that in between, right, where you brought in a new team, another team member to kind of really help with the process. And you know, the hardest part about that is letting go.

Abby Herman
Right? Amen.

Theresa Truong
Yes, and really allowing your new team member to own the hat that they are going to be stepping into. And you know what, one of the hardest parts is that there’s probably going to be a lot of errors, as much as we hate to hear that, right. But those are learning opportunities, we need to really know what not to do. We can only protect the process for so long for so much before we drive ourselves crazy, right? And just knowing that, like, you know what processes are meant to better improve us each and every time not to be perfect each, like 100% all the time. Because as you continue to evolve and grow, there’s new techniques, that’s going to better improve your efficiency and your productivity and also as well branch out and scale at a massive stage rate.

Abby Herman
Yes, I like that scaling at a massive rate. Is that what you said? I like that idea. But yeah, it’s very true. Letting go of some of the steps is very difficult to do. But it’s also very necessary to do I’ve what I’ve noticed with Maddy, my assistant is that she is much better at certain things than I am. And she has a much better attention to detail than I do on certain tasks. And, and it’s nice that I don’t have to worry about some of those things anymore. I just let her worry about them. Because I know that they’re going to get done. And my capacity as the CEO has expanded to the point where I don’t need to be worrying about some of the little details in someone else can take care of that. And that’s okay.

Theresa Truong
Yes. And you know, like sometimes as CEOs, we noticed those small details, but I promise you, your raving fans, your community will not likely notice that at all right? Like it’ll just be a passing cloud at the end of the day.

Abby Herman
Yes, yeah, well, and I’ve decided too long ago that done is better than perfect. And I would rather put things like this podcast out there and have it not be perfect and get the message out because it’s the message that’s important. It’s not that, you know, every single seminar is edited out or that the show notes are perfect, and you know, are long enough to get SEO on my website, that stuff I don’t care about so much as the actual message getting out there. If we waited for things to be totally perfect, we would not do anything ever. We’d be sitting around, you know, with our heads and our computer screens all day long and produce nothing.

Theresa Truong
Well, the one thing that I have noticed in the last few years have you ever for example, like books, you know that once a book is published, it’s kind of set in stone, but have you ever wondered why there is a version two of you know, edited version three and so forth? Right? It’s because they’ve remastered it years after and being able to say hey, this is the next iteration of it. This is the next body edition of it and so forth. And so, you know, as business owners That’s what we should aspire to be like, right? And just knowing that, hey, this is version 2.0, this is going to be version 5.0. And be okay with that.

Abby Herman
Yes, absolutely 100% this is such great information, I have to say, I’m going to give a little plug. Also, because I first became aware of your products and services, because through a subcontractor that I hired to help me with some things in my business, and I wanted help with putting together systems and processes and all of that. And so I messaged you, I don’t know, I must have been five or so months ago, and said, Okay, I want your membership. But I don’t want to be involved, I want to buy it from my assistant. And so she’s been in your membership for the last four and a half or five months and, you know, getting a handle and helping with the systems and processes. Can you tell listeners a little bit about the products that you have? And what that looks like.

Theresa Truong
For sure, for sure. So I run a membership called the SLP success lab. And what it is, is, it’s a place where we roll out SLP templates on a monthly basis. And there are over I believe 120 SOPs, right now. But that’s not including their respective resources. So for example, if an SLP references, a content marketing checklist, the checklist comes with the SLP itself as well. And so, you know, I early on last year, when COVID hit, I realized that there is still a lot of need out there for small businesses, especially the ones that are in between and starting to really look left off and grow. And you know, the hardest part is to really be able to sit down and write good quality SOPs, where you can have, you know, new team members come in onboard and be able to really run with things. And so that’s where, you know, the SLP success lab was really born out of that need, and that desire to really serve on a smaller and bigger scale. And so the SMP success lab, allows business owners to be able to have access to standard processes that we have tried and tested, and managed ourselves. And for you to be able to implement it into your business, as is if you felt that your processes were kind of clunky or not, or not as standardized as you would like, or it gives you a place work to continue to refine those tweak the SOPs to your your own processes and your unique ways. A lot of the feedback that we have gotten from our members is that, you know, they found that it better improved their own efficiencies, and really helped them simplify their processes as well. And so the SLP success lab is monthly, or annually, or there is also a lifetime access component to it as well.

Abby Herman
That’s so great. Yeah, I know that she’s grabbed some of those SOPs and started working on them within my business, and I so appreciate that. Can you tell everyone where people can find you between now and the summit? How can people find you? And how can they find out more information about the SLP success lab?

Theresa Truong
Absolutely. So you can always check out my website, which is www dot loop link inc.com. And I believe it’ll be added into the show notes. And then you can also find me on Instagram as well. And also as well, my YouTube channel.

Abby Herman
Oh, I didn’t know you had a YouTube channel. I will have to check that out. I’m following you on Instagram. I did not know about YouTube.

Theresa Truong
Yes. It’s always a fun thing. Sometimes you get to test the processes first, right?

Abby Herman
Haha, I love it. Well, thank you so much for being here. I appreciate it. And I cannot wait to see what you’re sharing at the summit. Absolutely.

Theresa Truong
Thank you so much for having me, Abby and I look forward to being on the summit with you.

Abby Herman
So I’m a big believer in developing systems for your content. And I love what Theresa said about internal content training materials for your team members. That is definitely something that I’m going to be implementing in the coming weeks and months. I can’t wait to learn more from Theresa at the Content Experiment Summit. Remember, you can register right now if you’re listening in real-time at the content experiment.com slash summit. We get started on March 15, 2021. If you’re listening later after March 15. Go ahead and go to the content experiment.com slash summit and sign up for the waiting list for the next round. If you found value in what you learned here today, be sure to share it on social media. Take a screenshot of the episode on your phone and share it over on Instagram stories. tag me at Abby Am Herman in the content experiment and tag Theresa at loop link, Inc. That’s Loop Link Inc and the more you share, the more we can get the podcast into the hands of more business owners, just like you who need to hear the message that they are not alone. Until next time, take care.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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