The Power of Pinterest with Amber Peterson - The Content Experiment
Pinterest marketing strategy

The Power of Pinterest with Amber Peterson

You know Pinterest is a great resource for recipes and crafting, but did you realize that Pinterest is actually a powerful, search engine (not social media platform) that exists solely to drive traffic to your website?

Amber Peterson, Pinterest Specialist and Founder of Pinwheel Strategic Marketing, and I chat about how to give all your archived content new life on Pinterest, how to create eye-catching actionable pins, and how to convert audiences once they arrive at your site.

To learn more from Amber about leveraging the power of Pinterest in your business, don’t forget to sign up for The Content Experiment Summit. She will be one of 25 speakers who are sharing bite-sized tips and tricks on how to get a better ROI on their time and financial investments in content and marketing. Follow the link to sign up for the waiting list. Registration opens Feb. 26. If you’re listening to this episode after the fact, don’t worry, you can sign up to be on the waiting list for the next round!

Tune in!

Mentioned in This Episode

About Amber Peterson

As a Pinterest marketing specialist and the CEO of Pinwheel Strategic Marketing, Amber Peterson knows that carefully crafted content paired with an intentional Pinterest strategy is the key to long-term visibility for most businesses. Whether she is creating and managing Pinterest strategy for her clients or educating on the value of these strategies, Amber leverages her marketing expertise to grow visibility and website traffic for entrepreneurs and business owners. When she is not working with her clients, she loves being outside with her family in the beautiful Pacific Northwest, wine tasting, and planning her next vacation.

You can follow Amber and Pinwheel Strategic Marketing on Instagram, Pinterest, or join her Pinterest Marketing Lounge on Facebook.

Transcript

Abby Herman
Hey there, and welcome to Episode 101 of the content experiment podcast, a podcast that supports the idea that content and marketing are ever-moving targets in any business. And it’s okay if you don’t feel like you’re doing it. All right all of the time, you have permission to experiment with little tweaks and changes in your content, to find out what works for you, what increases value for your audience, and what grows, your business, and most importantly, what feels good for you. I’m Abby Herman, content strategist and coach for online business owners who are ready to make a bigger impact online. I firmly believe that success isn’t about what big marketing brands and so-called gurus think is the right thing. It’s about you and your business, your lifestyle, and frankly, your values and belief systems. You get to do business in a way that works for you.

If you’re new to the podcast, I am so glad you’re here. I work really hard to bring you informative, and to-the-point content because let’s face it, no one has time for fluff. If you like what you hear, hit the subscribe button so you don’t miss another episode. If you’ve been around a while, yes, you are in the right place, and the stories and small business podcast changed looks and names with Episode 100. And I am thrilled to continue bringing you the same great content and guess under a new name. You can hear a lot more about the reason behind the change and the new name on episode 100. If you haven’t left a rating or review yet, what are you waiting for? leave a rating and review helps Apple Spotify, Stitcher, and all the other platforms and to me know that you like what you’re hearing. And it helps to get the podcast in more earbuds and who doesn’t want that. And on today’s episode, I am chatting with Amber Peterson, a Pinterest marketing specialist about you guessed it, Pinterest. Now, I admit upfront in the episode that I don’t know a lot about Pinterest, the work that I’ve done on the platform for my business thus far I’ve hired it out. I guess I know enough to be dangerous. And that’s about it. That’s why I’m so excited that in addition to this conversation I had with Amber she’s a speaker at the upcoming content experiment summit. Talking about Yeah, Pinterest. Let me tell you a little bit about the summit.

Before we get into ambers interview, the summit, which runs March 15, through 19th 2021 features 25 speakers plus me who are sharing bite-sized tips and tricks on how to get a better ROI on their time and financial investments in content and marketing. And when I say bite-size, I mean that the presentations are less than 20 minutes each. They’re designed specifically for you to be able to take what you need and go implement it right away. Because maybe what you’re doing isn’t quite working for you either you’re confused about what to create, or what you’re creating and publishing isn’t giving you the results you want. Maybe you want to start using a new platform or tool but you don’t know quite how to do that. We’ve got you covered in the content experiment summit. The free summit featured speakers on topics like automation strategy, online events, email marketing, content operations, selling with affiliates, honing your messaging, using podcasts to grow your business, customer journey, content accessibility, and so much more. And many of the speakers or people that you maybe haven’t heard from over and over and over again, I’m hoping to introduce you to new powerhouses that give you permission to do things just a little bit different. If you’ve been following me for a while, you know that that is really important to me if you can sign up for the waiting list right now at the content experiment.com slash summit. Registration begins February 26 for the waiting list only and it opens to the public on March 1. Are you wondering who the speakers might be? Well, everyone who has been a guest on the podcast since the first of this year is on the speaker lineup, along with today’s guest amber Peterson. In our conversation, Amber shares how to get noticed on Pinterest, which is a search engine, not a social media platform friends, how to figure out what keywords to use, what good posts look like, how often you should post and so much more. If you’ve been putting off learning about Pinterest like me, this is the episode to tune into. Let me tell you a little bit about amber before we get started.

As a Pinterest marketing specialist and the CEO of pinwheel strategic marketing, Amber Peterson knows that carefully crafted content Paired with an intentional Pinterest strategy is the key to long term visibility for most businesses, whether she’s creating and managing Pinterest strategy for her clients, or educating on the value of these strategies, ever leverages her marketing expertise to grow visibility and website traffic for entrepreneurs and business owners. When she’s not working with her clients, she loves being outside with her family in the beautiful Pacific Northwest wine tasting and planning her next vacation. Without further ado, let’s hear from Amber. Hi, Amber, thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you so much for having me. Yeah. So I am really excited to talk about Pinterest. And I just admitted to you before we hit record that I am not a big fan. But I do know, and I’m not a fan, because I don’t know how it works. I don’t understand it. And I think that that is probably the case for a lot of people. So I’m really looking forward to getting rid of all of the myths and the worry about what Pinterest should look like and what it shouldn’t look like. And so thank you so much for being here. Before we dig into the interview, I would love to know from you, in your own words what you do and who you do it for.

Amber Peterson
Sure. Yeah. So my company is pinwheel strategic marketing. And I work with primarily women who are content creators and want to get eyes to their website and don’t really know how to utilize the Pinterest platform. So what you said is pretty much exactly what people who work with me say. They’ve used Pinterest for recipes. And you know, the thing that it’s known for, and they don’t quite understand how it can benefit their business.

Abby Herman
Mm-hmm. And one thing that I know that is a huge myth about Pinterest is it is not a social media platform. It is not social. It is a search engine. Right?

Amber Peterson
Exactly. Some people call it the introvert social media platform because you don’t have to do any like interaction. When it first started, people would like comment, and so back like 2010, you could comment and stuff, but I can’t remember the last time I’ve even seen a comment. So yeah, it really people go on there to answer get questions answered, find inspiration and then move off to wherever those things live on the internet.

Abby Herman
Yes. Can you explain a little bit about how you work with clients? And I would also love to know, how does the way that you do your work with your clients? How does that help you to live the lifestyle you want?

Amber Peterson
Yeah, so I work with clients. In there’s really two paths, either people who create all their own content, and they just need someone to get it onto the Pinterest platform. And in that way, we strategize. We come up with the right keywords to use and we do all the like nitty-gritty of like scheduling and making sure that they’re consistently showing up on the platform. And then some of my other clients who want to be content creators, but or not, we actually create like the blog posts and things like that for them. The majority of my clients usually fall into the umbrella of they create their own content, which I love because it’s in their voice and all of that. And Pinterest I kind of fell into. I was a wedding planner for about 10 years, and I grew my business using Pinterest. And then I got really sick of wedding planning and my last wedding was in 2019, which I’m very thankful for that that was my last year. But I started really working with other business owners to replicate what I did with my marketing. And it was amazing to me that so many people plan their weddings on Pinterest, but so many businesses do not use Pinterest to show up in front of those couples. And so I’ve just niched down into that and moved completely away from weddings. But the biggest benefit of being in this business is that I am working at home I’m flexible for my children. I have three young daughters and we kind of can just do what we want you know travel well not right now but travel when we want to and my husband works from home as well. So we have a very flexible lifestyle which is really really nice.

Abby Herman
Yeah. Oh, that’s so nice.

Amber Peterson
Yeah, it’s a before I had kids, I always thought like I’ll work like a full-time job and it’ll be no big deal and now having children and seeing like it’s not just school, it’s all their extra stuff. I’m like how do people work and have kids like work a regular job, but it sounds like so much?

Abby Herman
Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah, I totally agree. Alright, so I fest up already that I’m not a fan of Pinterest, mostly people Cuz I don’t really understand it and how it works. So can you explain to listeners a little bit because I really want to hammer down the fact that it is a search engine? And it’s a place that your content can get noticed. But can you explain a little bit about how that happens? And then we can get into some of the details around it?

Amber Peterson
Yeah, absolutely. So Pinterest, the whole point of the platform is to get people to move off of it to secondary websites. So whereas like places like Facebook, and Instagram, and they want you to stay in their platform, and engage and do all the things there, Pinterest is really a search and discovery system. So people go to it to, you know, find ideas, get a question answered, you know, just find, find what they’re looking for. And where, you know, some platforms like you’d stay there, this, you click on the image, and you’re on the content creators website. So it’s really designed to move traffic to other websites. And for people who create content and you know, being a content creator, it’s, it’s such a labor to every piece, you really want to get the most bang for your buck. So I think of Pinterest. Is this like a visibility amplifier? Because you can show up in a way where people are actively looking for the answer to the question, and you can be the answer to the question. One thing that’s fascinating to me about Pinterest is people, it’s like 95% of the searches are unbranded So, whereas on Google, someone might be searching for, you know, something specific to a brand on Pinterest, you know, if you are kind of a small business or an unknown, you kind of have the same level playing field as someone who might be a huge thought leader in their industry, because the algorithm algorithms not rewarding, you know, the where you’ve ranked before. It’s just is the person typing in a question that you have an answer to. And that’s how you show up. So it’s this quiet little engine that can really just drive a lot of traffic to your website and get a lot of eyes on the content you spend so much time creating?

Abby Herman
Mm-hmm. Okay, so can you explain a little bit about what is Pinterest? Or the search, the search for, I guess, what are they looking for? When they’re looking for content, what makes a good post on Pinterest.

Amber Peterson
So a good post is really going to be it will, you know, there’s two parts to it. There’s the visual, which you want it to be eye-catching, and you know, the appropriate proportions that Pinterest gives you. But then there’s the description, which is where all your keywords live, and keywording on Pinterest is, I just think it’s so easy. Because you can actually go into the little search bar at the top is if you’re a user. And if you’re thinking about like, I don’t know, let’s I’m going to use one of my clients that I’m looking at their name right now, if you’re a teacher who creates content for speech therapists, you could type in speech therapist lessons, and it’s going to drop down with the most searched keywords or phrases or terms. And then you can just incorporate those into your own description because it’s telling you here’s what everyone’s searching for. So when you pair a good description, which is supposed to be very conversational, you know, you’re not trying to like game the system with just like, Okay, how many, how many terms can I cram in, you’re just writing a conversational description that hits some of those keywords with a nice graphic that hopefully has like the title of your blog post or video or whatever. That’s it, it’s very simple, very easy to replicate month after month to be consistent. With my clients, we create a set of pins that are like, branded to their business. And every month, we just change headlines and pictures. So it’s always brand consistent month over month over month. And you can also like, test and see like which ones are doing well and which ones are grabbing people and things like that. So I just feel like it’s a very simple and kind of elegant way to get your content onto this platform. It doesn’t take a whole lot of like, Okay, what do I need to do here? And what do I need to do here? They keep it simple and easy.

Abby Herman
Mm-hmm. So you mentioned earlier having a strategy for Pinterest, and then you just talked about, how do you like taking a look at the analytics and what’s doing well and what’s not. So how do you develop a strategy for Pinterest so that you get the most hits the most views the most clicks as possible?

Amber Peterson
Yeah, so it kind of starts with just figuring out your keywords. So there, when you start on Pinterest, it’s very easy to be like, Okay, I’m just gonna upload all this stuff. And it’ll be great. But you want to start with just doing, you know, tons of searching around your area of expertise. So if you are, you know, creating content around marketing on Pinterest, you would search, like, what are all the words that go into that and just make a big list of like, all the terms that come up a lot, you can look on your Pinterest business account, they have a trend app where you can type in like phrases or words, and it’ll tell you what else is trending around those. So you want to start with just figuring out, what are your best keywords, and for a lot of my clients, it goes hand in hand with kind of the keywords are using for their SEO strategy on Google or you know, whatever. And so we like to kind of look at that first and figure out like, what are our best keywords. And then once you have that in place, you want to think about the whole lifecycle of a Pinterest user. So the goal is to move people off the platform to your website. And once they get to your website, what do you want them to do next? I’ve had clients where we’ve gotten tons of traffic to their website. And the question, they’re like, well, it’s not converting, I’m not seeing an increase in my email list. I’m not, you know, they’re not doing what I want them to do. But if they’re landing on a blog post that has no call to action, nothing, as you know, you have to lead people down a path, they’re not going to be like, well, I wrote this blog post. Now let me search around for five minutes for what I should do next. Like you need to tell them what to do next. So we sit down with our clients and figure out like, Okay, once they leave Pinterest to this place, what happens then? And then once they’re, you know, if you want them on your email list, then what happens after that? Or how are you going to nurture that relationship and move them into a, you know, hot lead? Or, you know, they’ve raised their hand and said, Give me more information. So it’s really figuring out that whole lifecycle of the Pinterest user?

Abby Herman
Yeah. So is there a type of content that Pinterest or the Pinterest users are searchers, I guess, I don’t know what to call them, or type of content that they like better? And I keep asking that Pinterest likes, because we know that Facebook likes certain types of posts, and they prioritize certain types of post posts over others. And I didn’t know if Pinterest was similar in that way.

Amber Peterson
So Pinterest sort of does that there. Right now, what they’re telling us is that it’s they call them fresh pins. And what that means is, if you like if I write a blog post today, and I create 10, different pins, that all look different for that blog post, each of those pins is considered fresh. But if I created one pin, and just repeat that same one, 10 times over the next month, the first one is fresh, the next nine are not. So they’re going to deprioritize those, so you want your pins to look different, you know, not just like changing the font, but like really look, you know, different image, something like that. And then you also want to have a variety of different URLs. So you don’t want to just direct people to your homepage, you want it to go to an actual piece of content that is different I, my clients, asked them to at least create two pieces of content a month. Ideally, four is great. But you want to be providing Pinterest with something new so that they can keep feeding that up into there to the users that are logging in. And so it really depends on the user. So if you use Pinterest casually, you might notice like if you search for something like around Christmas, I was searching for like holiday cocktails. So then for like a month when I logged in everything that was in my home feed was holiday cocktails. So Pinterest tries to give the user similar content, what they’ve searched in the past. So it really depends on what the user has been searching for. But in terms of what gets people to click, or to save your pins. the visual is going to be the big thing. When you’re on Pinterest, you’ll see sometimes just like a picture with no words, nothing like all the text is in the description if there even as a description. Those don’t do as well, because a lot of people don’t click immediately there may be saving your pin to a board to go back to later. You know, they see it and they’re like, Oh, that’s that looks great. I’ll go back to it and check it out later. But if you have no context, and it’s just a picture, they’re not going to go back and be like, Well, here’s just a picture. Let me click through the website and see what that was all about. So you always want your images to say what it is So what is this piece of content and for a lot of people who you know, do blogging or videos, or podcasting, you want the headline on the image, not just in the description, but actually like overlaid on the image, because that’s going to get people to click through and also trigger their memory. When they’re looking back at what they’ve pinned in the past. Those are the ones that do the best.

Abby Herman
Okay, so what about video? Because I know that Pinterest allows video pins and other types of pins that are more than just a static image, right?

Amber Peterson
Yeah, so right now they have you can do video pins, which is a little snippet of video put into a Canva template, you can just add that in. And it can autoplay like when it’s hovered over in the feed. And then they’ve also rolled out story pins, which is similar to what is on Instagram, it’s you know, a series of pins that show up at the top. Those are fairly new. So I haven’t played around with those a lot. I feel like right now, I’ve, I’ve seen a lot more video. So I think it’s probably similar to when you know, Facebook started prioritizing video. I think that’s also happening on Pinterest. So with my clients, I like to do a little bit of each just to see, you know, like what’s grabbing attention? And what is converting for them in terms of clicks?

Abby Herman
Mm-hmm. Okay. And you talked about fresh pins and creating fresh pins from the same types of content and, and pinning, like you talked about, like 10 times, how often should we be pinning every day or every week? So almost a numbers game, right?

Amber Peterson
It is. Yeah. So with my clients, I use a scheduler called tailwind. And because you can, you can pin directly to Pinterest like upload directly to Pinterest, which I do a little bit of that because sometimes you’ll see a difference in the results. But for the most part, we use tailwind and my clients would use 300 pins a month. And that is not just their content that is like some repinned relevant but non-competitive content. And then yours is sprinkled in as well. Because one of the things about Pinterest, you don’t want it to be just a portfolio of your stuff. Because you want to be discovered when people are searching for things similar to you know what you offer. Or if someone else is serving a similar audience, and there’s your discovered among their stuff, that’s great, too. So with my clients, it’s about 60% of their content 40% repin content. And when you think about so a pin can go to multiple boards. And so if you say put one of your pins on five boards that fills five of those 300 slots. So it sounds like a lot when I say that it’s like what I did not want to do that much work. But it really fills up really quickly. And it’s just it’s really just getting your spins and your content in front of as many eyes as you can. And in front of an audience. That is the people you serve.

Abby Herman
Mm-hmm. Yeah. What, what are your thoughts on sharing older content, and resharing? So if somebody’s not creating two to four pieces of fresh content a month right now, would you go back into their archives and share some of that content as well?

Amber Peterson
Yeah, absolutely. Anything that is relevant to your audience, if it’s, even if it’s not new to your website, if it’s never been on Pinterest, it’s new to Pinterest. So it’s Yeah, I go back a lot of times to my clients like I didn’t get to, you know, create something this month, like, hey, let’s go back and see what’s something that did well for you or something that might be evergreen that we can get out there. Because the more that’s on Pinterest, the better, and the things on Pinterest last forever. I have a pin that I put up when I was a wedding planner in like 2011. And I still get notifications that it gives me at least 40 visitors to a website that’s not even, like, monitored anymore. And it’s just it is just evergreen. And so I’ve had clients where it’s like, we put something up and it’s a year later that suddenly it’s taken off. And we get a lot of traffic from this pin because it’s just been searched and shared and saved. And so it’s a place where if you’re creating content, it’s almost like why not put it there?

Abby Herman
Yeah, yeah, cuz it does. It truly does live forever on Pinterest, right?

Amber Peterson
Yeah. Right.

Abby Herman
So when you are working with clients, or you’re maybe taking over their Pinterest marketing for them, I’m sure you see some things that you’re like, oh, maybe we should do this a little bit differently. What are some things that business owners tend to get wrong and maybe you can share a couple of like tacks on how to correct that?

Amber Peterson
Yeah, the biggest, the two biggest things that I see is that they’re not spending a lot of time on their profiles, like the little description you get at the top, and all of your boards have a description. And a lot of times people don’t have anything there. And everywhere that you can put text on Pinterest, Pinterest is searching that. So it’s important to make sure that you know, in your bio, you have all the things that they asked for. And then also like, if you want to put like, you know, I, this is what I do. And this is who I serve, you know, like just all the things that you talk about in your business, your you know, your elevator pitch, or whatever you call it, that’s a great place to put it, it just gives people a better chance to know you. And then your board descriptions as well, you want to make sure that you’re using every little piece of space that they want you to put text, put text there. So that would be the first thing is I think a lot of times people just start an account and they get excited. And it’s time-consuming to write all descriptions. So just make sure you go back and do that. And the other thing is not creating like don’t recreate the wheel every month, when you’re creating your pins. Like if you use Canva, they have 1000s of pin templates that you can edit and modify. And that’s not necessary, just create like a block of maybe 1015, that you get them all on-brand for your business, and then just make the adjustments every month. So it’s quick. And so that when people discover you on Pinterest, like one month, it’s not like Oh, look at all these beautiful, like hunter green pins in the next month. It’s like peach, like, just stay consistent. With my clients. When we start, we first thing we do is create like 30 templates, and they narrow those down. And that’s what we use for the length of our contract. And then, you know, every year it’s good to refresh, but don’t do it. Like every month or you know, you can get just like stuck into Canva forever. I can do it myself. It’s fun. It’s mindless. But if you want that consistency in your brand, just like anywhere else your business shows up.

Abby Herman
Yeah. What if you’re rebranding? Should you be creating new? Should you, or I don’t even know if you can replace the old graphics with on-brand graphics for you know what it looks like right now?

Amber Peterson
You can? I would not, it’s so it would be so time-consuming to hunt that all down. I think it’s fine. You know, I mean, my business I rebranded last year. So I know that there’s going to be like, what it was before and what it is now. And I’m okay with that. It’s not really worth my time, my assistant’s time to go back and like, hunt that all down. And I think anytime you make changes to pass pins, you run the risk of just like, affecting, like, you never know what could happen when you’re on someone else’s platform. And if you have past pens that are doing great for you, I would just leave it alone.

Abby Herman
Mm-hmm. Okay,

Amber Peterson
if you’re rebranding, like once a year, then maybe, but I wouldn’t worry,

Abby Herman
and maybe rethink the rebranding strategy a little bit too.

Amber Peterson
So yeah, I don’t think it’s necessary to go back and change everything.

Abby Herman
Yeah. Okay. So what types of businesses are being found on Pinterest? Who should? Who should consider having a Pinterest strategy of some sort?

Amber Peterson
Well, my opinion is anyone who creates content can get value out of Pinterest. If you’re a business that is doing, you know, you’re trying to grow an audience, you want to be a thought leader. Anything that you want more visibility on, I think Pinterest can work for you. Even local businesses. If you only serve locally. You can keyword locally, you know, when I was wedding planning, I always put in, you know, Pacific Northwest weddings, Western Washington weddings, and people found me on Pinterest and hired me. So I think as long as you’re creating content, it’s a good platform. If you are 100%. Like I am not a content creator, my business does not put out a bunch of information that then I wouldn’t worry about Pinterest too much. It’s really for people who want more visibility and have the content to drive the traffic to their website.

Abby Herman
Would you say that businesses that are in more of a corporate space where they’re working with, you know, large organizations or that’s their target market? Would they benefit? Would it be beneficial for them to be on Pinterest?

Amber Peterson
I think I think so I think it is because it’s such a level playing field with what’s being searched. I think that there’s opportunity there for you know, bigger corporations. You’ll see a lot more on Pinterest. sponsored posts, which are the ads are from those like bigger corporations. So in that case, you, you know, it’s that might be a better, like, return on investment if you’re really if you have that budget and you’re the bigger company. But yeah, I think anybody who’s trying to drive traffic can do it with Pinterest. And so it’s it just comes back to having the content that people search for on the platform.

Abby Herman
Yeah. You gave such great tips, too. I love it. So in addition to signing up for the free summit, where else can they get more from you? Between now and then.

Amber Peterson
So probably my website is the best place to go. It’s just pinwheel strategic marketing.com. Like you said, there is the webinar series. I have some blog posts there just about general questions about Pinterest that I get asked a lot. And then there’s a Pinterest marketing blueprint download. It is yet a lot of times people come to me and to my website, they’re just like, do I ever need to be on Pinterest? And so it’s a great place to just get some information about like is Pinterest even something you’re interested in and be you have the time to commit to.

Abby Herman
And if you don’t have time to commit, then talk to Amber, right?

Amber Peterson
I love Pinterest. And it’s funny you say like you don’t understand it. My husband says the same thing. And I’m like, well, it’s my job. He’s like, I just don’t get it.

Abby Herman
When- So about four, almost five years ago, I moved into the house that I’m in right now. And my daughter was she decided to start a Pinterest board for the new house because we were going to buy new furniture and all of that when we moved in. And she even sent she sent me the board and I’m like, I don’t even I don’t know how to look at those. I don’t know how to find the information, just Can you print it out? I felt so old. But I totally understand the value of it. And I mean, I’ve seen people get results from it. And I know that I mean, as a search engine, you want to be there period, because it’s a search engine. So you definitely want to get content out there. So people can find it.

Amber Peterson
Yeah, absolutely. And the biggest thing that I would say is if you’re just getting started, just give it time, like it takes time to get traction. And like we said earlier, your content lasts a long time on there forever, really. And so, you know, I find it takes you know, at least three months to see traction, but six months is really when you start seeing it click. But a lot of people are like, I’ve been doing this for two months, and nothing’s happening. So really give it some time and have that mindset of like it’s consistency. It’s a slow burn platform. So just have that mindset. So you’re not like, I’m done.

Abby Herman
Yeah, like any content marketing task, or it always takes time it is a marathon, it’s not a sprint. And yes, absolutely. I guess three to six months, I would say six months is probably be just be patient. Because once you get a little bit of traction, once you start getting a little bit of results. I think that naturally, you’re just gonna it’s just going to get better and better. Right?

Amber Peterson
Yeah, absolutely. And the other thing to think about when you’re thinking of your like mindset of how long this takes is, depending on what you do and who you do it for. There’s Pinterest is seasonal. So if you are doing, you know, if you sell the most of your services around New Year’s, you want to start getting those pins up around September because people start searching earlier than when they need it right then and you want. So that’s why that slow growth is part of it is because you’re gonna see a peak at a certain time. And you’ll see lulls other times of the year. And so you can’t just look at the numbers for like today and be like this isn’t working or this is great because it could be better tomorrow or it could be worse tomorrow. And so it’s really like a long-term strategy.

Abby Herman
Yes. Thank you so much for being on. I can’t wait to learn more from you at the summit. And anybody who wants to sign up, it’s the content experiment.com slash summit to get your free ticket.

Amber Peterson
Well, thank you so much for having me. I can talk about Pinterest forever. So yeah, I love talking.

Abby Herman
I love it. Thank you so much. I’m gonna have links to your webinar series and all your social media in the show notes for everyone to check out.

Are you ready to dig in and learn about Pinterest after this episode, I kind of am to even though I’ve been resistant about Pinterest Up to now, but it will have to come after the content experiment summit where amber is one of our speakers. Let’s learn from her together. Remember that you can sign up for the waiting list at the content experiment.com slash summit. Registration for the waiting list opens on February 26, where you will get a special price on the all access pass if you choose to upgrade. If you found value in what you learned here today, be sure to share it on social media. Take a screenshot of the episode on your phone and share it over on Instagram stories. tag me at Abby M Herman, and at the content experiment. The more you share, the more we can spread the word that you don’t have to do business like everyone else. It’s okay to experiment with little tweaks and changes in your content and your marketing to find what works for you. What increases value for your audience and what grows your business. Until next time, take care

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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