Being True to Yourself in Business with Helen Tremethick - The Content Experiment
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Being True to Yourself in Business with Helen Tremethick

Being true to yourself and your values is the only way to live, in my humble opinion. But doing that in a big, public space like your business–or the internet–can feel hard.

But wouldn’t you rather be yourself and attract the right people to you every day than having calls with people who aren’t sure…and who don’t quite know if you’re for them (and vice versa)…and who don’t get you incredibly excited to get to work each day?

Today on the podcast, guest Helen Tremethick and I talk about why being yourself is the only way to be, and why clarity is SO much better than creativity when it comes to the content you create every day.

Listen in!

Mentioned in This Episode

About Helen Tremethick

Helen Tremethick is a brand voice strategist & business coach who helps entrepreneurs find the courage, confidence, and clarity they need to grow and scale their businesses. Formerly the CEO of The Communications Distillery, Helen has recently rebranded under her own name. Since 2011, she has worked with hundreds of business owners to clarify their messaging, copy, business models, and transform their self-confidence while doing so.

If you’re looking for the skills you need to show up and speak up in your business, Helen’s the solution for you. Helen lives in an old farmhouse in the middle of the Ontario countryside, which means if you ever hop on a coaching call with her, you might hear roosters. You can find and follow her on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, and join her Love & Badassery group on Facebook.

Transcription

Abby Herman
Hey there, and welcome to Episode 87 of the stories in small business podcast, a podcast experience that puts to rest the idea that we all need to do business the same way and celebrates the unique stories and paths that we’re all on. I’m Abby Herman, content strategist and coach for online business owners who are ready to make a bigger impact online. I’m here because when I first went full time in my business in 2013, I struggled to find the help and support I needed to figure out what the heck I was doing so I could grow my business. My business is the sole income in my household and I struggled hard. I vowed to myself that if I was able to grow, I would be a resource to other business owners when I could afford to do so. This podcast is just part of that journey.

If you are new to the podcast, welcome. I work really hard to bring you informative and to the point content because let’s face it, no one has time for fluff these days did we ever. If you’d like what you hear, hit the subscribe button so you don’t miss another episode. I usually release episodes every Monday morning and every other Thursday morning. However, as we prepare for the content experiment summit coming up in March, My plan is to release twice a week, every week until March 15. And there are a few weeks where you’ll see three episodes. Every podcast guest during quarter one of 2021 is the speaker at the summit. And I can’t wait to bring you their knowledge and expertise in a much bigger way. Yes, you heard me right. There’s a summit coming developed specifically for coaches on course creators to help them identify tiny tweaks they can make to their content. So they can see better results on their podcasts on their videos on social media, even in the organization and back end content and more. More information is coming about the summit. But you can sign up to get on the waiting list at the content experiment.com/summit, there’s going to be a special something extra for the folks who are on the waiting list when the doors open in the next few weeks.

Something that I think is going to make the summit really stand out. And that will make it an even better resource than the next summit or then the other summits out there is that I was really incredibly intentional when inviting speakers and reviewing speaker applications. It was my goal to have the most diverse lineup possible. And to include summit new voices, who we really haven’t heard from in this kind of format. There are so many business owners who have something amazing to say, and I want to showcase them I want to give new voices or even just different voices and opportunity to be heard. I talked about this a little on today’s episode, but I found today’s guest Helen traumatic because of a random comment that she made in a Facebook group. I wish I remember what it was she said about whatever it was it sparked me to go do some light internet stalking. I went to her website and fell in love with her messaging, which I guess is how she came to be here on the podcast talking about messaging, right. And it’s exactly why she is a speaker on the summit talking about messaging and your branding. In this episode, we talk about how to develop your brand voice the importance of clarity over creativity online such a pet peeve of mine, what consistency means when it comes to content and so much more. Let me formally introduce Helen before you listen in. Helen tramatic is a brand voice strategist and business coach who helps entrepreneurs find the courage, confidence and clarity they need to grow and scale their businesses. formerly the CEO of the communications distillery, Helen has recently rebranded under her own name since 2011. She has worked with hundreds of business owners to clarify their messaging, copy business models and transform their self confidence while doing so. If you are looking for the skills you need to show up and speak up in your business, Helen’s the solution for you Helen lives in an old farm farmhouse in the middle of the Ontario countryside. Which means if you ever hop on a coaching call with her, you might hear roosters let’s listen into today’s conversation. Hi, Helen, thank you so much for joining me today.

Helen Tremethick
Hi Abby. Good to be here.

Abby Herman
Yes, I am so excited to chat. I am really excited after our little pre recording chat. Those are always fun. Um, can you I’ve already introduce you, but can you share with listeners in your own words what you do and who you do it for?

Helen Tremethick
Sure. My name is Helen Tremethick. I am a brand voice strategist. I’m a business coach. And I’m a thought partner. And you can find me at hunch method calm. But what I do is I help people through the process of finding the right words for their right people.

Abby Herman
I love that. Can you talk a little bit about how you work with your clients. And then I always love to find out to how the way you work with your clients helps you to live the lifestyle that you want.

Helen Tremethick
Sure. So ultimately, the work that I do in the work that I do, the words are the result of the work. And what I mean by that is that running a business is a very emotional, introspective, busy, overwhelming thing. And so with that, there can be a lot of micro decisions that happen through every single day. And I help people work through those so that they can remain in alignment with who they are, their values and what they believe in, and subsequently then showing up consistently and clear for their business. So the words are the result of the the deeper, more introspective work that we do together.

Abby Herman
Oh, I’m like that. Okay, so how does that help you in the way you want to live your life and your lifestyle? And maybe your your scheduling the way you schedule things into your life and into your business? How does that work?

Helen Tremethick
Oh, yeah, I love this question. So I live on a permaculture, education, center and farm, which means that though I run a business online, I also with my partner run a business. In person, we run in person workshops, where we teach people about permaculture and about gardening and living regeneratively, which is more than sustainably. So in order to do all of those things, that means that this work that I do here, is scheduled such that I can create more margin for things like running workshops being present for students who are on the farm, helping with homeschooling My child, being there to feed the birds and pick eggs and do all of that farm stuff. So it was never wasn’t always this way. And when I was running the communications facility, which was the name of my business up until a rebrand earlier this year, in 2020, I was living in a smaller city, and we didn’t have the farm. So it looked a lot like I think most people running your own business do that day and day, oh, my kid was going to public school. But this year, and in recent years, things have been much more different. And I’ve needed to create that margin and grace in this business in order to sustain the rest of my beautiful responsibilities.

Abby Herman
That is fascinating. How can do you mind if I ask how that came about the move to a farm? That’s just totally fascinating to me.

Helen Tremethick
Sure. So my partner and I, we were living in Toronto, this is a number of years ago, a decade ago. And it was we both were very familiar with the fast pace of living in a major city. And we knew that we wanted to get a bit quieter. On the birth of our child, we had the opportunity to move to a smaller city, which we took up very quickly. And we were there for five years. By that point. My partner was running the community gardens, he was guerrilla planting along the river trails, he had taken over the laneway and planted all sorts of raspberries. So the neighborhood kids could come around and pick fruit during the summertime. And when we realized it was so great, but we realized that he was gardening all over the city. And we really needed to bring that closer to home.

So our mortgage was coming up and we started looking for the next opportunity. And we found one in a part of a live in Ontario, Canada, in a part of the province that neither of us had ever been to. And it was there. It was ready. We were ready. And so we took the leap. And that was two and a half years ago now.

Abby Herman
Oh, I love that. How fun raspberries all over the place that reminds me of I lived in Pennsylvania and until I was eight years old and down the road from our house was a Mulberry Bush. Oh yes. My sister and I used to go down there and we would pick them all berries. And then I can remember going back home and like shoving them at my mom and saying they’ll make us a pie or do something with this and we would eat them and yeah, that just brought pack that memory. I haven’t thought about that in a really long time. Really fun, mulberry childhood memories as well. Oh, fun. So one of the things I love it that you talk about a lot is being yourself in business and making sure that people can see your personality who you are as a human being. Because, yes, we’re in business. And we want to make, we need to make money in order for it to actually be a business. But we need to be ourselves. So that’s really important. And I think that’s why a lot of us left corporate or for me, I left education so that I could be more of me and my own business. When I go to your website, I can find out stuff about you that makes you really unique. And it makes you seem like a really fun person to work with. Like, you’re used to roller derby. You cuss a little bit, you know, you have you have a little bit of profanity on your website, not a lot a little bit, can you share what being yourself in your copy and your messaging and just your business, what that means and kind of what it looks like when you are developing your brand voice?

Helen Tremethick
Thanks, Abby, this is a great question. Thank you, you really touched on it in the introduction where you said that you can really sense what kind of a person you are. And we are all unique individuals, running businesses, and we’re selling our services to people, unique individuals who may or may not be running businesses. And I think a lot of times when we talk about marketing, or the big gurus talk about marketing, they talk about it as this thing that is separate from us as people as personalities, when ultimately, our goal is me this one person to put myself and my services out there to another person. And the better that I can, or you can convey who we are, what we believe in what moves us what’s important to us. The faster you as a prospective client or your prospective clients understand that they’re in the right place, the faster that they’re able to connect with you because that’s what comes before conversions. Everybody talks about your click through rates and what your conversions are. But they forget that what happens before a person converts, what happens before they become a data set, is that they become captivated by you. They like you they know you they trust you they under feel heard and understood. And then they want to take the next step. And that might be a short time. And that might be a long time. Eventually there’ll become a conversion. But what happens before that, that’s where we really that’s the real playground where we can convey who we are to our right people.

Abby Herman
Now, I yeah, we definitely I totally agree the the captivation piece, you know what happens first, using your messaging to attract the right people to you. And it’s people it’s not, you know, it’s not a sale. You know, it’s it’s a person eventually it might lead to sell, but you’re attracting people and making connections with people. So yes, exactly. What does that look like? When you are developing your brand voice when you’re developing the messaging, the words that you want to use to? I guess, I was gonna say, promote, but that’s not the right word. But to demonstrate who you are, how does someone how does a business owner start to wrap their heads around what that might look like and feel like and sound like, on their website on? whatever they’re posting on social media? How do you start to develop that, that voice?

Helen Tremethick
Hmm. as well. Some of it is practice and time. So I don’t want to say do this, and then that and then you get these results, because a lot of this work is not so formulaic, and I would be a liar. If I said that it was and I think that any templates that say that, if you do this and fill in these blanks here, then you will get these results are lying to you. So so I’ll just have that out right at the beginning. But a lot of the work is about who you are coming back to those values. What do you believe in what have you always believed in? Who Have you always been and the more that you can kind of explore that, what you really believe in as a company and not just like, I believe in community, but if you if you don’t have proof of that, then it’s not a real value.

So if you believe in community, then we need to see that you spend some of your time volunteering or that a certain percent of your revenue goes to an organization or that you you do things on the week. hands that are deeply community based. And then we know it’s a true value, because we can see the proof and action. So a lot of this work of finding your brand voice comes back to what you believe in, I encourage my clients to go through a couple of different processes. One of those, the very beginning of a is a manifesto writing process. And that allows you to uncover all of that really juicy motivation, that has always been there, the stuff that is that undercurrent of your business, and helps you really kind of lean into that energy. And then the other part of that the business part of that is to create a brand voice roadmap that allows you to be consistent every single time you sit down to write. And if you have a team, then you can share that with your team and it becomes consistent brand voice across the board as well, no matter who’s writing.

Abby Herman
So this goes way beyond developing your mission, vision and values for your business. It goes even deeper than that. What is can you talk about the manifesto and what that what that entails?

Helen Tremethick
Yeah, absolutely. So I have a course called f your elevator pitch. And it is I usually spell that F out the four letter F, four letter, the four letter F, your elevator pitch, it is a process to backup a second, it came out of frustration around the templated. I am such and such who does this thing for these people. And that’s a really good square one for new business owners to describe what they do. I am a web designer who designs websites for small business owners, etc.

But once you’re on square two or square three of your business, it tends to feel really static and dull and not like it really represents who you are as a business owner. So as your elevator pitch, is a process of going through all of the reasons why you started this business in the first place, all of the things that you’ve done that really light you up all of the things that make you who you are, and subsequently different from those other webs, web designers who design websites for small business owners. And and so what ends up happening through the course is that you create a manifesto. And in doing so you can take that Manifesto, put it up on your wall, put it on your website, you know, use it as cloth, napkins, what have you. And you can also take that pull out copy for your website, because these are the pieces that are unique for you. You can whittle it down into social media BIOS. And you can change your elevator pitch from something that’s like, you know, I am a web designer robotic to I create beautiful experiences online.

Abby Herman
I’d love that. Okay, so that’s a really good segue to something that you and I were talking about before I hit record. And that is, it’s important to be unique and to be different. But there’s a fine line in there. Can you talk a little bit about that? And where? Where is the line? Where? Okay, that’s a little over the top in the creativity department. And it’s, I don’t know what you actually do for a living?

Helen Tremethick
Absolutely, we were talking about clarity. So yeah, framework is kind of love and badass, right? Everything I do is under this love and badassery sort of umbrella. And one of those aspects is clarity. Clarity is so so important. So yes, we we are unique. And we want to showcase that unique self. And I think what happens is sometimes we we try to fit ourselves into these templates, these boxes, these like particular things when we’re starting out that don’t fit. And then we swing the pendulum the other way. And sometimes that comes that’s a page full of F bombs. And sometimes it’s, you know, expressing who we are in ways that are really quite unclear to our people, even our right people. It’s unclear. So a lot of this work is about bringing that pendulum back to that center, your center, your unique center. So whether you use f bombs or not, whether you use them lightly or not, and whether you are but still being clear about what you’re writing, who you’re writing to, and what your your web pages are called. And this is what we’re talking about beforehand. Yeah. But you don’t need to call your services page threads of connection, call it services, you want people to go there you want to make it easy for To know where to take the next step, hold your users hand through your website so that they know quite easily where to go next, so that they can say yes. So if you don’t like the word services, call it work with me. But let your people know how to make that next step. Because clarity is, is so much more important than creativity when it comes to a web presence.

Abby Herman
Yes, 100%. I see. Maybe I don’t see as much of it anymore. Maybe it’s because I just stopped looking and stopped trying to try to figure things out. But I have seen business owners who their copy on their website, or what they’re putting on social media is quirky, and fun. But it takes so much energy to read it because I don’t because you have to think too much. And so I can’t think what do they actually what do they actually do? I can’t tell you how to be clear, you need to have that clarity.

Helen Tremethick
There was a little while there where every single agency had scrolling words like innovation. And like, yeah, so when you’re going about creating your own website, it’s great that you’re innovative, I think most of us are. But tell your people, tell your people what you do and how you can help them. A lot of there’s a copywriting process that talks about pain, agitation solution. So you start with the pain, how your people are feeling you agitate it, make it feel more depth a little deeper, yeah, to get to bed. And so that, you know, imagine what would you do? If you did? What would it look like if you didn’t do anything now? And so really kind of poke the wound a bit, and then introduce the solution? The solution is you You’re the best etc. I propose something different. And that is on your websites, even on your social media kind of across the board? pain? Yes, you want to meet your people where they are, where they’re experiencing this difficulty, or this challenge or this issue. But instead of poking the wound, offer a possibility for something lighter, and, and more hopeful. So instead of what would your life be like if you didn’t take action? instead? What would your life be like if it looked like this? instead? You’re let’s offer some hope and some possibility, and then introduce yourself as the solution because you’re the best image to etc.

Abby Herman
So instead of calling them to action, necessarily, you’re calling them to, to see what if or what could be.

Helen Tremethick
Yes, exactly. So. So yeah, offering, what if what could be look at this possibility. And so when we’re talking about clarity, you can do this throughout your website, meet your people where they are, offer the possibility and then offer the solution always being really clear about all of those steps.

Abby Herman
I like it interesting. Okay, I see that because I think that that’s much more of a, that’s much more of a visual. And it’s like what, you know, I don’t do like manifestation and things like that. But I think that that’s kind of it sounds like that might be kind of along the same lines where you are, you’re envisioning this future for yourself, like every day. So let’s say right now we’re recording this, it’s the middle of December of 2020. I have this vision for 2021. These are the things that are possible for me. And so now I’m looking for a solution so I can get to that piece. So I’m doing that internally within myself that that’s something that you absolutely could do as a business owner, who is selling something to someone who needs that solution. They’re envisioning this future. And so now you have the solution to make that a reality.

Helen Tremethick
And you’re mirroring that envisioning. That’s happy. Yeah.

Abby Herman
Yeah. Interesting. Okay, I like it. So can you um, so as somebody is crafting the content, or the copy for their social media for their website for a talk that they’re doing for whatever? Where do you see business owners struggle the most when it comes to really honing in on their voice and their messaging?

Helen Tremethick
This is a great question because it does vary. There’s a lot of hiccups around the about page because we want to share all of our story. And the sneaky secret is the about page. We call it about me But it’s not about me, it’s about you. It’s about the client. So again, like meeting your client, where they are, and then offering yourself as a solution and giving some rationale as to why you’re that right answer.

That’s, that’s the rule. Or rather, like, that’s what you want your about page to do. And so every page needs a job, your about page is to show the rationale why you are that solution to their problem? I think. So I think a lot of people get stuck around that they just get stuck in their bio, and not really sure what to share, what not to share, and so on. That what to share what not to share comes up a lot. How much of that pendulum Do you want to swing? How how vulnerable do we want to be? How much of our story do we want to share. So I recommend for everybody to write it out, like write your your first draft, make sure it’s messy, make sure it’s imperfect, but make sure it’s imperfect, just get it out of your body. And then you can start cutting back and editing and, and seeing because you don’t need to hit it right the first time. The other thing is anything, people seem to consider their websites as a bit of a set and forget it, they go through a big redesign, they they hire somebody on, they’re so excited, and then they don’t do anything with it again. But you are an evolving entity, and your business is an evolving entity. And so your website must be as well. So coming back, remembering that it is a fluid document that lives in the public sphere coming back to rework it, that’s a good thing. It’s a really positive thing that it shows that you’ve grown and you’ve evolved. And that’s what that means that you’re doing what you’re supposed to be doing.

Abby Herman
Yes, as part of prepping for the summit in March that I’m hosting that you’re going to be a part of, and I’m really excited. I have been, I’m redoing, I’m basically redoing my entire life, business, everything all at the same time, because why not. And I was looking actually, just yesterday, last night, I was looking at my website, the copy on my website and all of the pages on my website. And I was like, Oh my gosh, because I have said it and forgotten it. I I have not practiced what I preach. And I have not gone in and reviewed the copy and reviewed everything. And so much has changed. So much has changed. Since that, you know, and I have made a little, a few little tweaks here and there. But there are, yeah, a lot of things that are going to change. Hopefully by the time your podcast episode goes live, it will look totally different, or at least sound totally different on the pages before we change everything else over. So yeah, I totally agree it’s a you are in evolving. person being business owner and things are going to change in your business, which means they need to change on your website to that.

Helen Tremethick
It’s a good thing to change it on your website. And yeah, so there’s a lot of hesitation around altering. But firstly, people aren’t tracking, they don’t notice you also don’t notice that they’ve changed a couple of words on your favorite artist websites, so people aren’t noticing whether you’re changing it up or not. But also the search engines really like it. They really like to know that a website isn’t static, that it is fluid and evolving. So it’s actually in your best benefit to go in there. keep it fresh, keep it updated. If you don’t like that word anywhere, change it.

Abby Herman
Yes. That brings me to perfectionism. Because I think a lot of people feel like, oh, once it’s out there on the internet. It’s, it’s there. It’s forever, which Yeah, it’s true to a point, however, does it really have to be perfect? before we hit publish on something? Can we talk a little bit about that? It doesn’t have to be perfect.

Helen Tremethick
Okay, so I am not a big believer in binaries. Anyway. So so the idea of perfect, I think it’s something that we could forever chase and never really quite get there. Because because we’re evolving because we’re changing because things the world changes in a blink of an eye and so things are not as relevant or perfect as we thought they were. So no, does it need to be perfect before you hit Publish? No. What it needs to be is your current best effort. And that’s it, knowing that it’s imperfect, knowing that it’s your current best effort and that then you can hit publish, knowing that you can you have the power to go back and change it and you will. So I often talk to my clients about putting it out there.

So first, firstly, we get it out of our bodies, unpublished, we get it out of our bodies, that we whittle it back, make sure that it’s clear, make sure that it’s consistent, make sure it’s on brand and aligned with who we are, and then jump in, because we can hang out on the side of the pool forever, but that is not getting you sales. So you jump into the deep water, and knowing that you have resources available to you to change as you grow as you move forward.

Abby Herman
Can you talk what you mean? What do you mean by consistent? I mean, as far as the actual tone or the cadence by you know that you put content out there. What does that mean?

Helen Tremethick
By consistent, I mean, two things first, yes, tone and language. So in your brand voice in your brand voice in your brand was so consistent in that way, so that it always sounds like you. And one of the reasons why you want that is because we don’t know exactly where your person is going to land, whether that’s on that about page, whether it’s on your home page, whether it’s on a social media space, you and I probably know each other from a random Facebook group. So we don’t really know exactly where your person is going to land. And the more consistent you can be and showing up as you online, the easier it is for your person to recognize you and recognize themselves in you. So that when you do hop on a call, eventually, however long that that like, quote, unquote, conversion process takes, when you hop on that call, that sales conversation has already happened. It’s already you’re only talking about how you’re going to work to go there or not whether you’re a good fit or not, because they know they have some qualified in. So you want consistency and tone and language showing up genuinely across the board. Because it’s helpful. It’s helpful for your sales conversation. But yes, also consistently, that you need to show up, you need to show up on your social media, you need to be sending out your email newsletters, you need to be hopping on podcasts, you need to be posting on medium, or Pinterest or whatever, wherever your platforms are. That consistency is important as well.

Abby Herman
Yeah, yeah, you mentioned that you and I connected in a random Facebook group. And when I approached you about being on the summit, I mentioned that I saw you post something somewhere, and it sparked something in me, I went and stalked you online, I wrote your name down as a potential speaker for the summit, and then continue to like, you know, kind of follow some of the things that you were doing, because I knew you would be a really good fit. And I and you and I so so it, we didn’t even have to have the sales conversation in that sense, either. Because I already knew that I wanted to have you be a part of it. And so when I reached out to you, I, I, you know, I already knew. And so then I felt like I was selling myself, and it gave you all of the answers to all of the potential questions you might have about the summit. It was like, boom, that was easy.

Helen Tremethick
Exactly. And thank you, thank you for all those kind words. But and exactly, like, that’s exactly the way that we get so hung up on marketing and sales and what that feels like it feels like it. Because we don’t want to be that guy at car sales in place that’s like upselling, or like, we don’t want to be that. And so because we don’t want to be that we don’t be at all, where brandvlei strategy comes in, is that it helps us stay aligned with who we are, how we show up, and why. And then no matter where we are, if we’re doing that, if we’re doing that regularly, then your sales conversations are getting started before you even know it.

Abby Herman
So when people do come across your table, they say, you are exactly who I thought you were. Mm hmm. It makes it so much easier. It saves so much time and frustration for everyone involved.

Helen Tremethick
And, and it also self qualifies the wrong people out, which is also a good thing that we don’t talk about very often that we don’t want all of the people to say yes, we only want the right people to say yes. And I want to acknowledge the privilege of that statement. Sometimes you have to take the job, just for the job just for the money. And that is totally okay. So I just want to honor that for a moment. And say when we’re talking about brandwatch strategy when we’re talking about like the ideal ways of marketing, then we want the wrong people to land on our site and be like, wrong place. hit the back button. And that is a good thing too.

Abby Herman
Yes, yes, it is. Absolutely. This was such a great conversation. I am So excited to see what you have for us in the summit, can you because I know we’d still have a little bit of time before that, can you let people know where they can find you online. And I know you also have a freebie that where you kind of walk through or telling the story of different entrepreneurs and how they became a little more authentic and visible online. Can you talk a little bit about that, and then how we can find you? Absolutely.

Helen Tremethick
So earlier this year, that’s earlier 2020, I ran a community project, where I gathered 30 other entrepreneurs together to talk about how they grew their businesses, while becoming more authentic to themselves. So I picked people who really shined vibrantly in their industries, who really stood up spoke their opinions, and had growing scaling businesses and also a little bit about what happens behind the scenes. And so that was the love and badass red community project. At the end of it, a realize that these stories were just too important to hide behind a paywall. And so they’re available at love and badassery calm. So it’s love in bed astro.com and you can sign up and then you get all 31 stories for this 30 plus needs 31 stories of behind the scenes, how people will grow their businesses, there are some brilliant insights in there that are super powerful, and are designed. It’s really just great for anybody, no matter where you are in your business. So that’s loving badassery calm. Otherwise, you can find me at Helen’s method calm on Instagram at Helen drum ethic. Or I have a Facebook group that’s loving badassery and you can find me there too.

Abby Herman
Fantastic. And I’ll have links to all of that in the show notes. Thank you so much, Helen for joining us today. And I can’t wait to see you again in March.

Helen Tremethick
Thank you likewise.

Abby Herman
Such a great conversation, wasn’t it? I love Helen’s take on imperfect action and consistency and messaging. Yes. How often you show up matters, but so does how you show up as well. Thank you so much for listening in to today’s episode. I am so excited for Helen’s talk during this summit because messaging is a big place where business owners get hung up in their content. You can get on the content experiment summit waiting list at the content experiment.com slash summit. If you found value in what you learned here today, be sure to share it on social media. Take a screenshot of the episode on your phone and share it over on Instagram stories. tag me at Abby Herman and Helen at Helen turmeric, you can go to the show notes to find the correct spelling of her last name. The more you share, the more we can get the podcast into the hands of more business owners just like you who need to hear the message that they are not alone. Until next time, take care.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

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